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Buhari

2019 presidency: Buhari knows nothing about democracy, vote Atiku – Amaechi tells Igbos

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A First Republic Minister, Chief Mbazulike Amaechi, has said that President Muhammadu Buhari does not understand the language of democracy.

According to him, the candidate of the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, has repeatedly given a clear assurance that he would restructure the imbalanced federation.

He, therefore, called on Igbo electorate to vote for Atiku and his running mate, Peter Obi, to get Nigeria on the path of progress again.

Amaechi addressed reporters at his country home at Ukpor in Nnewi South local government area of Anambra State on Tuesday.

He said, “As the very last surviving nationalist, freedom fighter and minister of the first republic still alive, I feel compelled to say something and warn those who may be plotting to plunge the country into a major crisis that may threaten the very foundation of our federation.

“Nigerians must brace up and defend democracy and the federation itself. There is grave danger ahead. Those who destroyed democracy is 1983 are up again to deprive the people of their fundamental rights.

“They don’t understand the language of democracy. From what they are doing to the judiciary and legislature, one can imagine what will happen if for any error they are returned to Aso Rock.

“I call on the international community to help and expose the evil plans, of a cabal who wants to perpetuate themselves in power even if they lose the election.

“They have been badly marginalized, exploited, denied of their rights in a federation that they played a major role in founding.

“Atiku has also taken our own Peter Obi as his running mate. I call on Ndigbo at home and everywhere in Nigeria to turn out in totality and vote for the Akiku/Obi candidacy for the president.

“I speak the minds of the great nationalists like Nnamdi Azikiwe, Ahmadu Bello, Abubaker Tafawa Balewa, Obafemi Awolowo, Dennis Osadebay, Aminu Kano, M.I. Okpara, Maitama Sule, S.L. Akintola, Herbert Macaulay, Festus Okotie-Eboh, Nwafor Orizu, Joseph Tarka, Eyo Ita, Odeleye Fedahunsi, Muhammadu Ribadu, Zanna Bukar Dipchadima, Kola Balogun, Margret Ekpo, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti, HajyaGambo Sawaba, Mary Nzimiro, Maggie Obinwe, Malam Umoru Altune, Bisi Onabanjo and others who have been silenced by death in pleading with Nigerian Voters to vote into power, the rare gift of Atiku/Obi presidency so that fraternal love and unity may return in a democratic united Nigeria.

“In the other elections, they can vote for their individual parties or conscience. Ndigbo should not mind a small band of mercenaries and Judases who went to Wuse Market at Abuja, bought some Red Caps, adorned the caps and trouped to Aso Rock, spoke some sweet nonsense, received some greasy handshakes and sheepishly smiled home. They represent nobody but their treacherous selves.”

On the call for boycott of the election by Indigenous People of Biafra, IPOB, Amaechi added, “As a political father in Nigeria and Igboland, I had appealed to the youths of IPOB, in the interest of Igboland, not to pursue their election boycott programme. It is counter-productive and suicidal.

“I call on the government to de-proscribe IPOB. It is primitive injustice to leave the gun- bearing Fulani herdsmen and their jungle comrades in Zamfara State alone and turn to kill the youths of IPOB because they are Igbo.”

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Buhari

Northern elder sends message to Buhari govt over Sowore’s detention, attacks Atiku, others

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Ambassador Ibrahim Kasai, a Northern elder and former Ambassador of Nigeria to Ukraine, has advised the federal government to continue keeping the detained leader of ‘Revolution Now’ movement, Omoyele Sowore, in security custody and prosecute him urgently for the crime of treason.

According to him, Sowore’s alleged plan was to destabilise President Muhammadu Buhari’s government because he failed the last presidential poll.

Kasai also slammed former Vice President, Atiku Abubakar, and other prominent Nigerians who called for Sowore’s release, saying their actions were selfish and against national interest. https://dailypost.ng/2019/08/03/atiku-said-omoyele-sowores-arrest-dss/

Speaking with Sun newspaper, the ex-envoy said: “Well, by way of contributing to the national discourse, let me say that what is going on now in the country is not good for our national development; a crime is a crime.

“If somebody said he is leading a revolution, the word revolution alone connotes a change in government; look at our constitution, you cannot change government just like that, nobody has the right or power to just change the government; the only way you can change the government is through the ballot box, that is why the electoral system is there.

“More so, Sowore contested an election and lost to President Muhammadu Buhari and I don’t think he is doing this because he lost an election because for every crime, there is an intention; this is to say he had the intention and he acted; he has completed the act of a crime. When you conceive an idea and you practise it, that is an act.

“What the DSS have done is right, he should be charged for treason and that is all, crime is crime. There is no need trying to douse tension that he was only trying to discredit what was going on; there is no room for that.”

On the call for Sowore’s release, Kasai said: “The advice of those citizens is not in the National interest; it is a selfish advice, we all know that the opposition has the right to criticise but the choice of word revolution is not good; there is no second definition of revolution.

“You can criticise the government, yes but also offer solution. Whatever the PDP Presidential candidate said, and those in support of the act is not in the National interest.”

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What I find annoying in Obasanjo’s letters to Buhari – Junaid Mohammed

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Elder statesman and northern politician, Dr Junaid Mohammed, has faulted the controversial letters published by former President Olusegun Obasanjo regarding the state of the nation.

Chief Obasanjo wrote some open letters to the current President Muhammadu Buhari listing concerns, worries about security situations in Nigeria. https://dailypost.ng/2019/07/15/breaking-obasanjo-raises-alarm-another-open-letter-buhari-full-text/

However, Dr. Mohammed has said he does not really think the letters were altruistic in their motives.

Dr Mohammed, who was a guest on Channels Television’s NewsNight on Monday, insisted that Obasanjo should have given his advise to Buhari in whispers, because of his place in the society.

The Second Republic lawmaker said, “Fundamentally, I believe in a democracy everybody must have his say that includes those who are perverse of majority view or those who are perverse in minority view.

“What Obasanjo says is as important as what somebody who is walking the land, the fields in his farm and certainly what he says is as important as somebody who works in a factory or works in a government office.

“Why I take issues with Obasanjo and we have been friends for a very long time since 1976, I could go to him, see him anytime when he was in the cabinet office, we have a number of friends in common.

“What I find difficult is this obsession with making public matters that ought not to be made public because by making them public, you are in fact going into a contradiction and what you say may in fact be counter protective.

“Secondly, even though Buhari was his junior in the military, and they fought the civil war together even though Buhari did not work directly under him, and it is not my headache, it is not my business to defend Buhari and I’ve never defended him because I believe if you are in public life, you are fair game whether you are president, whatever public office you are holding in a democracy, and I always underline ‘in a democracy’.

“Now if you may want letter public, it creates whatever it was it wanted to create, you make a second one, again it hasn’t had much of an impact, you also have seen him in between the first and the second one and you also have seen him in between the second and the third one. That shows that you are not giving him advice in public because you don’t have access.

“People like me who are commoners or like you may not be able to go in and see the president but he (Obasanjo) can see him anytime, he can talk to him anytime, the only thing he cannot do perhaps for security considerations might be to simply ask him to come and see him but if it were the reverse, he could actually ask Buhari to go to Ota or Abeokuta to go and see him.

“And if you want to advise somebody and you are really truly sincere about it and you are not out for cheap publicity, you do it in whispers, you go and whisper at him so and so cannot be right, my experience is that so so is also not right but if you decide to go the pompous way, write a big letter and quote A, B, and C, tell how much history you know, how many geographies you know, how much connections you have with the heads of state and heads of government it becomes counterproductive and what you say may be very important, so you can see that the man you are advising will not be able to benefit, the country will also not benefit from some of these things and that is why I thought enough is enough of this public letters.

“And if you write somebody a public letter, by definition you are not advising him, you are making cheap publicity for the country to organize and your own relevance either in the scheme of things or in what happened or you are trying also to cultivate your own place in history come what happens in the future, you may also be trying to say, after all, I got it right everybody else got it wrong and that is unfortunate especially when you are talking about the destiny of 200 million people.”

Though Dr Mohammed agreed that Obasanjo made some highly valid point in his letters to Buhari, he, however, notes that the messenger and the manner in which the message is passed is as important as the message itself.

He said, “In the words of late Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, no man is entirely evil and you cannot dismiss a man who has been a president twice, no. but the manner of conveying a message is as important as the messenger himself and the topic which he tries to address.

“So I will be the last person that has known him intimately in terms of very serious discussions about the future of this country. But the way and the manner and the style of presentation is as important as the message itself and that is what we learn in public life, I have no doubt in my mind that a lot of what he has been saying is important but it is important only if it is going to be utilized for improvement and for good of the country.

“If it’s going to be used like in the market place, then at the end of the day, we are going to get ourselves into unnecessary skirmishes and vulgar language and people taking positions on primordial sentiments and not necessarily on what is ought to be rationally advisable for the good of the country.”

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Atiku Obasanjo

My Views About Obasanjo And Buhari -Junaid Mohammed

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Dr. Junaid Mohammed, a Second Republic lawmaker, has expressed reservations about former President Olusegun Obasanjo’s public letters to President Muhammadu Buhari.

Speaking as a guest on ChannelsTV’s ‘News Night’, the politician said, “I am very cautious in reading or defining meanings into what people say or try and treat their own motives. Fundamentally, I believe in a democracy everybody must have his say that includes those who are perverse of majority view or those who are perverse in minority view. They say the minority will have their say, the majority will have their way but that is not to say that one part is important the other one is not important, everybody is important.

“What Obasanjo says is as important as what somebody who is walking the land, the fields in his farm and certainly what he says is as important as somebody who works in a factory or works in a government office. Why I take issues with Obasanjo and we have been friends for a very long time since 1976, I could go to him, see him anytime when he was in the cabinet office, we have a number of friends in common.”

He said further: “What I find difficult is this obsession with making public matters that ought not to be made public because by making them public, you are in fact going into a contradiction and what you say may in fact be counter-productive.

“Secondly, even though Buhari was his junior in the military, and they fought the civil war together even though Buhari did not work directly under him, and it is not my headache, it is not my business to defend Buhari and I’ve never defended him because I believe if you are in public life, you are fair game whether you are president, whatever public office you are holding in a democracy, and I always underline ‘in a democracy’.”

Continuing, the northern politician noted, “Now if you may want letter public, it creates whatever it was it wanted to create, you make a second one, again it hasn’t had much of an impact, you also have seen him between the first and the second one and you also have seen him in between the second and the third one. That shows that you are not giving him advice in public because you don’t have access.

“People like me who are commoners or like you may not be able to go in and see the president but he (Obasanjo) can see him anytime, he can talk to him anytime, the only thing he cannot do perhaps for security considerations might be to simply ask him to come and see him but if it were the reverse before Buhari became head of state first time he is the president and now the second time, he could actually ask Buhari to go to Otta or Abeokuta to go and see him.”

Condemning Obasanjo’s mode of letter-writing, Mohammed stated, “And if you want to advise somebody and you are really truly sincere about it and you are not out for cheap publicity, you do it in whispers, you go and whisper to him so and so cannot be right, my experience is that so so is also not right but if you decide to go the pompous way, write a big letter and quote A, B, and C, tell how much history you know, how many geographies you know, how much connections you have with the heads of state and heads of government it becomes counter-productive and what you say may be very important, so you can see that the man you are advising will not be able to benefit, the country will also not benefit from some of these things and that is why I thought enough is enough of this public letters.

“And if you write somebody a public letter, by definition you are not advising him, you are making cheap publicity for the country to organize and your own relevance either in the scheme of things or in what happened or you are trying also to cultivate your own place in history come what happens in the future, you may also be trying to say, after all, I got it right everybody else got it wrong and that is unfortunate especially when you are talking about the destiny of 200 million people.”

According to the former legislator, the former president should have been more circumspect in his letters.

Mohammed said, “In the words of late Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, no man is entirely evil and you cannot dismiss a man who has been a president twice, no. but the manner of conveying a message is as important as the messenger himself and the topic which he tries to address.

“So I will be the last person that has known him intimately in terms of very serious discussions about the future of this country. But the way and the manner and the style of presentation is as important as the message itself and that is what we learn in public life, I have no doubt in my mind that a lot of what he has been said is important but it is important only if it is going to be utilized for improvement and for good of the country.

“If it’s going to be used like in the market place, then at the end of the day, we are going to get ourselves into unnecessary skirmishes and vulgar language and people taking positions on primordial sentiments and not necessarily on what ought to be rationally advisable for the good of the country.”

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